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First published online June 4, 2013

Developmental Origins of the Other-Race Effect

Abstract

The other-race effect (ORE) in face recognition refers to better recognition memory for faces of one’s own race than faces of another race—a common phenomenon among individuals living in primarily mono-racial societies. In this article, we review findings suggesting that early visual and sociocultural experiences shape one’s processing of familiar and unfamiliar race classes and give rise to the ORE within the 1st year of life. However, despite its early development, the ORE can be prevented, attenuated, and even reversed given experience with a novel race class. Social implications of the ORE are discussed in relation to development of race-based preferences for social partners and racial prejudices.

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Published In

Article first published online: June 4, 2013
Issue published: June 2013

Keywords

  1. other-race effect
  2. perceptual narrowing
  3. face perception
  4. face recognition
  5. face processing

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© The Author(s) 2013.
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History

Issue published: June 2013
Published online: June 4, 2013
PubMed: 24049246

Authors

Affiliations

Gizelle Anzures
Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Birkbeck, University of London
Paul C. Quinn
Department of Psychology, University of Delaware
Olivier Pascalis
Laboratoire de Psychologie et Neurocognition, Université Pierre Mendes France
Alan M. Slater
School of Psychology, University of Exeter
James W. Tanaka
Department of Psychology, University of Victoria
Kang Lee
Institute of Child Study, University of Toronto

Notes

Gizelle Anzures, Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Henry Wellcome Building, School of Psychology, Birkbeck, University of London, Malet St., London, WC1E 7HX, United Kingdom E-mail: [email protected]
Kang Lee, Dr. Eric Jackman Institute of Child Study, University of Toronto, 45 Walmer Rd., Toronto, Ontario, M5R 2X2, Canada E-mail: [email protected]

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