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Research article
First published online October 2, 2014

‘It makes you think’ – exploring the impact of qualitative films on pain clinicians

Abstract

Background:

Researchers need to consider the impact and utility of their findings. Film is an accessible medium for qualitative research findings and can facilitate learning through emotional engagement.

Aim:

We aimed to explore the usefulness of a short film presenting findings from a published qualitative synthesis of adults’ experience of chronic musculoskeletal pain for pain education. In particular, we were interested in the impact of the film on clinician’s understanding of patients’ experience of chronic pain and how this knowledge might be used for improved healthcare for people with pain.

Methods:

Focus groups with healthcare professionals enrolled in a pain management foundation course explored healthcare professionals’ experience of watching the film. A constructivist grounded theory approach was adopted by the researchers.

Findings:

This article presents one thematic exemplar from a wider study. Participants reflected upon the pitfalls of judging by appearances and the value of seeing the person beneath his or her performance.

Conclusion:

There is a danger that the impact of qualitative findings is under-valued in clinical education. We present one exemplar from a study exploring knowledge mobilisation, which demonstrates that qualitative research, specifically qualitative films, can make us think about the care that we provide to people with chronic pain.

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References

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Published In

Article first published online: October 2, 2014
Issue published: February 2015

Keywords

  1. Musculoskeletal pain
  2. chronic pain
  3. qualitative research
  4. knowledge
  5. transfer
  6. patient experience

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© The British Pain Society 2014.
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History

Published online: October 2, 2014
Issue published: February 2015
PubMed: 26516558

Authors

Affiliations

Francine Toye
Physiotherapy Research Unit, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Oxford, UK
Sue Jenkins
Department of Anaesthetics, Intensive Care & Pain Medicine, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Heath Park, Cardiff, UK

Notes

Francine Toye, Physiotherapy Research Unit, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Oxford OX3 7HE, UK. Email: [email protected]

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